*Certain restrictions apply. *Certain restrictions apply; eligibility not based on income.

Treat plaque psoriasis differently

Treat psoriatic arthritis differently

FOR US AUDIENCES ONLY
SEE MORE

*Certain restrictions apply. *Certain restrictions apply; eligibility not based on income.

APPROVED USES

Otezla® (apremilast) is a prescription medicine approved for the treatment of patients with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis for whom phototherapy or systemic therapy is appropriate.

Otezla is a prescription medicine approved for the treatment of adult patients with active psoriatic arthritis.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

You must not take Otezla if you are allergic to apremilast or to any of the ingredients in Otezla.

Otezla can cause severe diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting, especially within the first few weeks of treatment. Use in elderly patients and the use of certain medications with Otezla appears to increase the risk of having diarrhea, nausea, or vomiting. Tell your doctor if any of these conditions occur.

Otezla is associated with an increase in depression. In clinical studies, some patients reported depression, or suicidal behavior while taking Otezla. Some patients stopped taking Otezla due to depression. Before starting Otezla, tell your doctor if you have had feelings of depression, or suicidal thoughts or behavior. Be sure to tell your doctor if any of these symptoms or other mood changes develop or worsen during treatment with Otezla.

Some patients taking Otezla lost body weight. Your doctor should monitor your weight regularly. If unexplained or significant weight loss occurs, your doctor will decide if you should continue taking Otezla.

Some medicines may make Otezla less effective, and should not be taken with Otezla. Tell your doctor about all the medicines you take, including prescription and nonprescription medicines.

Side effects of Otezla include diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, upper respiratory tract infection, runny nose, sneezing, or congestion, abdominal pain, tension headache, and headache. These are not all the possible side effects with Otezla. Ask your doctor about other potential side effects. Tell your doctor about any side effect that bothers you or does not go away.

Tell your doctor if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant or planning to breastfeed. Otezla has not been studied in pregnant women or in women who are breastfeeding.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-332-1088. 1-800-332-1088.

Please click here for Full Prescribing Information.

Stories from people who chose Otezla for their plaque psoriasis

Note: in clinical studies, approximately 1 out of 3 people with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis had 75% clearer skin after taking Otezla® (apremilast) for 4 months.

See before and after photos

Though you wouldn’t know it from looking at him, Bob is an avid motorcyclist.

He got his first bike when he was 18, and he’s had a motorcycle ever since.

View Bob's story Hide Bob's story

Being on the bike, open road ahead of him, is one of the only things, Bob says, that makes him feel free.

His plaque psoriasis, on the other hand, makes him feel the opposite. He’s had it for years, and as much as he wishes it wasn’t, psoriasis is a big part of Bob’s life. His symptoms first started in his mid 30s, following his divorce. As a single dad, he found himself taking his daughters to their social activities, including the local pool. At first, he thought nothing of it.

Then one day, one of the girls said, “What is that on your back?” Sure enough, Bob had red, scaly patches on both his back and his arms.

I started to wear a t-shirt to cover up whenever I went to the pool.

By the time he was in his 40s, Bob noticed the patches were getting larger, and were also appearing on his elbows and knees. At first, he thought it was just irritation, and for the most part, he ignored it—but he couldn’t ignore the reactions of those around him, especially children, who looked at him like he was a monster.

Red and scaly skin could be intimidating to people, especially children.

Bob’s father had lived with psoriasis for years, and as soon as he saw the patches on Bob’s skin, he told him what it was, and recommended he see a dermatologist. So Bob made an appointment, and got the diagnosis that confirmed his suspicions: he had plaque psoriasis.

My initial reaction was, ‘Why is mine so much worse than my dad’s?’

His dermatologist put him on topical creams and scheduled him for UV light therapy, which he tried for a little while. Then he tried other oral treatments, but had trouble finding one that worked for him. By the time he was 50, he felt like he’d tried it all—so his doctor recommended injections. Frustrated, Bob agreed to give them a try. While they worked for a little while, Bob wasn’t satisfied with the results.

I wasn’t a big fan of either of those treatments.

He started doing research online, determined to find a different treatment. That’s how he stumbled upon Otezla® (apremilast). He asked his dermatologist about Otezla, and she told him it wasn’t an injection or a biologic, but instead, a pill he’d take twice a day. Bob’s dermatologist mentioned that the Otezla Prescribing Information has no requirement for ongoing lab monitoring or initial lab testing, and discussed the risks and benefits of Otezla.

Bob and his dermatologist decided he should try it. After taking Otezla for 4 months, Bob noticed that his skin was looking clearer. Finally, he’d found a treatment that worked for him. Now, when he hops onto his bike, it’s not to escape his psoriasis. As he says, “I ride because I want to—and finding a treatment that worked for me was one of the things that got me to this point.”

Hide Bob's story

Christy was a shy child, and as a teenager, struggled with her body image.

Even before she began to experience the symptoms of plaque psoriasis, she felt ashamed of her body and uncomfortable in her skin.

View Christy's story Hide Christy's story

When her symptoms first appeared, Christy did some research online, and narrowed it down to eczema or psoriasis—so when her dermatologist delivered the diagnosis, Christy wasn’t surprised.

I knew psoriasis was something I’d always have to live with.

Christy’s dermatologist prescribed a steroid cream, which cleared up a plaque on her ankle—but her plaque psoriasis continued to spread, first to her legs, then to her elbows and arms.

I tried not to focus on how bad it might get, and tried to take life day by day.

As Christy’s symptoms worsened, her confidence dropped. She stopped wearing shorts and dresses, covering her plaques with long sleeves. When her peers at work made hurtful comments, asking if her symptoms were contagious, she didn’t challenge them.

I let my desire to hide hold me back from my life. My world was shrinking.

In addition to creams, Christy tried laser and tanning treatments, but nothing gave her the results she was looking for. She asked her dermatologist what else she could try, and he told her about Otezla. Christy decided she was ready for something different.

I jumped at the opportunity to try a different treatment.

Although it took some time, Christy’s symptoms improved. After 4 months on Otezla, her plaques became clearer. For the first month, she had an upset stomach and nausea, but these symptoms have become less frequent over time.

After joining an online support group, Christy was inspired to talk about her struggles with psoriasis, and to share her story as an ambassador for Otezla. Though she still has insecurities, she’s learned not to let them consume her. Instead, Christy has learned to focus on the positive.

Don’t focus on the negatives of psoriasis. Focus on what you can do to manage it.

Hide Christy's story

Johnna first noticed her plaque psoriasis when she was 21.

She found a small spot on her head, and assumed it was a tick bite—but her mom was concerned.

View Johnna's story Hide Johnna's story

Johnna’s mother also had plaque psoriasis, but she’d never found it to be much of an issue in her day-to-day life. Johnna assumed her experience would be the same.

I thought my plaque psoriasis would be like my mom’s and it wouldn’t be a big deal.

This wasn’t the case. Johnna developed plaques on her knees and elbows. She saw a dermatologist, who prescribed a variety of different creams, but nothing seemed to help. Her dermatologist then recommended biologics, but Johnna was apprehensive to try other available treatment options.

Over the years, Johnna’s plaque psoriasis became a dominating part of her life.

After some time, her symptoms calmed down a bit, but Johnna feared they would return. That fear kept her researching, and staying informed on the treatment options available to her. Through her own research, Johnna heard about Otezla but she was nervous about seeing a dermatologist again.

Luckily, her mother was very persistent and persuaded her to see someone. Soon, Johnna relented, and made an appointment with a new dermatologist to discuss her options.

At the appointment, Johnna asked her new dermatologist about Otezla. After discussing it further, her dermatologist mentioned that in clinical studies, treatment with Otezla was associated with depression and weight decrease, and that taking other medicines with Otezla may decrease its effectiveness. Her dermatologist also told her that the most common side effects of Otezla were diarrhea, nausea, upper respiratory tract infection, tension headache, and headache.

I take Otezla as directed by my doctor. One in the morning, and then one again at night.

Sometimes after she took Otezla, she would get a little nauseous. Her dermatologist suggested that she take it with food, and that seemed to help her. After 4 months, Johnna saw about a 75% improvement in her plaque psoriasis.

I still have some rough patches, but I have less redness and flaking.

Hide Johnna's story
Otezla is a different kind of treatment Close

Approved Uses

Otezla® (apremilast) is a prescription medicine approved for the treatment of patients with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis for whom phototherapy or systemic therapy is appropriate.

Otezla is a prescription medicine approved for the treatment of adult patients with active psoriatic arthritis.

SEE MORE

*Certain restrictions apply. *Certain restrictions apply; eligibility not based on income.

APPROVED USES

Otezla® (apremilast) is a prescription medicine approved for the treatment of patients with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis for whom phototherapy or systemic therapy is appropriate.

Otezla is a prescription medicine approved for the treatment of adult patients with active psoriatic arthritis.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

You must not take Otezla if you are allergic to apremilast or to any of the ingredients in Otezla.

Otezla can cause severe diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting, especially within the first few weeks of treatment. Use in elderly patients and the use of certain medications with Otezla appears to increase the risk of having diarrhea, nausea, or vomiting. Tell your doctor if any of these conditions occur.

Otezla is associated with an increase in depression. In clinical studies, some patients reported depression, or suicidal behavior while taking Otezla. Some patients stopped taking Otezla due to depression. Before starting Otezla, tell your doctor if you have had feelings of depression, or suicidal thoughts or behavior. Be sure to tell your doctor if any of these symptoms or other mood changes develop or worsen during treatment with Otezla.

Some patients taking Otezla lost body weight. Your doctor should monitor your weight regularly. If unexplained or significant weight loss occurs, your doctor will decide if you should continue taking Otezla.

Some medicines may make Otezla less effective, and should not be taken with Otezla. Tell your doctor about all the medicines you take, including prescription and nonprescription medicines.

Side effects of Otezla include diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, upper respiratory tract infection, runny nose, sneezing, or congestion, abdominal pain, tension headache, and headache. These are not all the possible side effects with Otezla. Ask your doctor about other potential side effects. Tell your doctor about any side effect that bothers you or does not go away.

Tell your doctor if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant or planning to breastfeed. Otezla has not been studied in pregnant women or in women who are breastfeeding.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-332-1088. 1-800-332-1088.

Please click here for Full Prescribing Information.

Important Safety Information

See more

You must not take Otezla if you are allergic to apremilast or to any of the ingredients in Otezla.

Otezla can cause severe diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting, especially within the first few weeks of treatment. Use in elderly patients and the use of certain medications with Otezla appears to increase the risk of having diarrhea, nausea, or vomiting. Tell your doctor if any of these conditions occur.

You are now leaving otezla.com

The content of the linked site is the sole responsibility of the site provider. Celgene Corporation does not control or endorse this third-party website.

Click "OK" to proceed or "CANCEL" to return to otezla.com.